Ephesus (Kusadasi)

Mom and Dad had already seen Ephesus, so Dirk, Tracy, Domingos, and I decided to book a small tour to see the ruins rather than joining one of the huge tour bus groups. We used the company Hello Ephesus, which did a fantastic job. Our guide, Sait, met us right outside the ship, and it turned out that the four of us had him and the minivan all to ourselves! It was a very, very hot day, but with such a small group, Sait was able to steer us to the shady bits while he talked. He was extremely well informed and provided a wonderful tour. We also got to visit the Terrace Houses, where the wealthy people lived. The excavation work is remarkable, and even though the houses date back to the 1st century AD, there was a lot to see. Intricate decorations on the floors and walls as well as indoor plumbing and heated floors!

Our guide read us the entire inscription and told us what it meant, but I can't remember all that he said!
Our guide read us the entire inscription and told us what it meant, but of course I can’t remember it now, a week after the tour
Library at Ephesus
Library at Ephesus
View of the 1st floor of the Terrace Houses from the 2nd floor
View of the 1st floor of the Terrace Houses from the 2nd floor
Painted walls inside the Terrace Houses
Painted walls inside the Terrace Houses
Intricate floor mosaic in the Terrace Houses
Intricate floor mosaic in the Terrace Houses
The four of us in front of the Grand Theater
The four of us in front of the Grand Theater

After the tour, we went to a rug factory/shop where we saw the rug weaving process all the way from putting the silkworm cocoons in hot water and then unraveling them into long silk strands, to intricate tapestries being woven with more than 900 knots per square inch. Domingos and I succumbed to the gorgeous rugs and bought one for ourselves, and then we all headed back to the ship. We were just in time for Domingos to take part in a mixology class, which he enjoyed.

 

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