Cooking Bibimbap

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I realize that bibimbap is one of the easiest Korean dishes to make, but I thought it would be fun to sign up for a cooking class while Dirk and Tracy were visiting. This is the class we booked, and it was a really fun experience.

Our instructor met us right outside Anguk Station and was extremely nice. We walked about ten minutes to reach the little building she works at, where another very sweet Korean lady was there waiting as well. I’m embarrassed to admit that I can’t remember their names! We took the class a month ago, and I’ve gotten so bad about remembering things now that I’m in my forties. We three were the only students, and the women had the room all set up with ingredients, cutting boards, and electric skillets.

 

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I quickly realized that I would be better off taking notes, snapping photos, and leaving the chopping to Dirk and Tracy. Dirk is especially skilled with a knife so he took over from my pathetic chopping efforts!

First, we simmered bean sprouts in boiling water with a little salt for 10 minutes (at which point we rinsed them in cold water and drained them). Then we separated out the enoki mushrooms, julienned the carrots, thinly sliced the zucchini, and chopped the bracken.

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Each of the vegetables needs to be fried in a little oil separately to keep their flavor profiles distinct.

After finely chopping the beef, we fried it with a little garlic and salt.

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We made the paste with sesame oil, garlic, red pepper paste (gochujang), and a little sugar.

Everything came together very easily. You first add cooked rice to the serving bowl, arrange the veggies on top, drizzle a little sesame oil over it all, add the desired amount of paste, and fry an egg sunny side up to serve on top.

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Mix it up and you have a delicious bowl of bibimbap!

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After lunch, the ladies took us around the neighborhood before we parted ways.

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Dirk, Tracy, and I headed over to Jogyesa Temple next, where there were a lot of lotus plants at the end of their blooming cycles.
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A lovely day in the Anguk/Insadong area!

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